Skip to main content

Reviews

Shakespeare's Birthplace. Photo by Paul Appleyard
Once the largest house on Henley Street, Shakespeare’s birthplace was probably given as part of Mary Arden’s dowry upon her marriage to John Shakespeare, a glover who was later to become mayor of Stratford. Upon John’s death, William inherited it…
Stonehenge. Photo by Qalinx
When I was living just south of Devizes, I used to love dropping by Stonehenge on the way past to London, or Salisbury, or wherever. It was easy to park the car and amble across the road to look through the chain fence, or take a stroll round the…
Hall's Croft. Photo by Allan Harris.
Hall's Croft was the house of Shakespeare’s daughter, Susanna, and her husband, Dr John Hall. This Tudor house has main rooms which are decorated and furnished as they would have been during Susanna’s time, but with some rooms on the first…
Shakespeare's Grave. Photo by David Merrett
Shakespeare is one of the best known, and loved, playwrights of the Tudor (or indeed any) age, and Stratford has become synonymous with his name. So, a visit to Stratford-upon-Avon really should include a visit to the great man’s grave. Shakespeare…
Restormel Castle
Restormel Castle in Lostwithiel was built around 1100, but what we see today mainly dates from the 13th century. It was owned by the Cardinhams, who supported de Montfort during the Second Barons’ War, but the Castle fell into the hands of Henry III…
HMS Warrior. Photo by Rennett Stowe
HMS Warrior is one of the lesser known ships in Portsmouth Historic Dockyard, which is a massive site containing a number of museums and other attractions. Launched in 1860, HMS Warrior was part-steam and part-sail powered, and the pride of Queen…
HMS Victory. Photo by Amanda Slater
HMS Victory was Nelson’s flagship, on which he fought, and died, in the Battle of Trafalgar. As such, it is of massive historical importance, unlike many other ships that are open to the public. Not only has this warship seen battle, but it led the…
The National Maritime Museum, Sammy Ofer Wing. Photo by Elliott Brown
Set in delightful Georgian buildings at Greenwich, the National Maritime Museum (NMM) was established by Act of Parliament in 1934 and opened to the public by King George VI on 27th April 1937. It offers free entry to most exhibits covering several…
The Cutty Sark, photo by Robert Pittman
Dry docked, and raised three metres off the floor, at Greenwich, the Cutty Sark was one of the last – and one of the fastest – wind powered tea clippers. Designed to sail from London to China and back again faster than her competitors, her speed…
Shrewsbury Castle looking West by Micolo J
Shrewsbury is the county town of Shropshire, with an interesting history and interesting buildings to go along with it. The Shrewsbury Castle promised to be one of these interesting buildings: King Stephen lay siege to it in 1135, and it was briefly…
Subscribe to Reviews